Demystifying Google’s main Web metrics: Their impact on SEO and conversion rates

Intro
If you’ve got a website, chances are you’ve come across this term before. But what exactly is it? And more importantly, how do they affect your website’s SEO and conversion rates? Do you need to understand complex algorithms and codes to improve them?

Google’s “Core Web Vitals” – a new set of indicators that measure the user experience of your website – are becoming increasingly important for SEO. They focus on three specific aspects of user experience: loading, interactivity and visual stability.

In simpler terms, they measure how quickly your website loads, how interactive it is for users and how stable the content is during loading. However, before you ask for help and start thinking about how to choose a digital marketing agency, it’s essential to understand these aspects.

What are Google’s core metrics? Introduction to LCP, FID and CLS and how they measure page experience
Largest Content Panel (LCP): This metric is concerned with the loading performance of your website. But what exactly does it measure? It’s the time it takes for the largest image or block of text in the viewport to become fully visible after the user loads the page. Imagine entering an art gallery; LCP is the time it takes to reveal the main exhibit. A good LCP score means your visitors don’t have to wait, which improves their overall experience.
Time to first entry (DPI): This indicator takes into account the interactivity of your site. Have you ever clicked on a button and had to wait for the site to respond? That’s what first-entry delay measures: the time that elapses between the moment when the user first interacts with your site (clicks on a button, a link, etc.) and the moment when the browser is actually able to respond to that interaction. A low DIF means your site is responsive and quick to react, keeping your users engaged and satisfied.
Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS): This measure concerns visual stability. Have you ever been reading an article online and suddenly the text shifts, displacing what you’ve been seeing?

Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS): This measure concerns visual stability. Have you ever been reading an article online and suddenly the text shifts, moving what you were reading out of your field of vision? That’s what CLS indicates: the unexpected shifting of elements on your page while it’s still loading. A low Cumulative Layout Shift score ensures that your users don’t lose their place or get frustrated, thus enhancing their experience.

In the digital landscape, impatience is a common trait; milliseconds can make the difference between a converted customer and a lost prospect. This is where Largest Con tentful Paint (LCP) plays a vital role. From an SEO point of view, faster loading times can lead to higher search engine rankings.

But why? A fast-loading page holds the user’s attention, reduces bounce rates and promotes a better user experience. It’s not just about appeasing the search engines; it’s about making the most of your audience’s time.

The question now is how to optimize it. There are three key areas you can focus on: images, JavaScript (JS) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

Images: High-resolution images are great, but they can lengthen page load times. Consider using next-generation image formats such as JPEG 2000, JPEG XR or Web, which offer superior compression and quality characteristics to PNG or JPEG. As far as CSS and JS are concerned, defer non-critical JS and CSS and minimize unnecessary characters in your JS, CSS and HTML files to reduce their size and speed up loading.
JavaScript: Optimize your JavaScript code. Reduce or, better still, eliminate resources that block rendering. Carry over..

JavaScript: Optimize your JavaScript code. Reduce or, better still, eliminate resources that block rendering. Repost unused CSS and off-screen images using JavaScript. Remember, every line of code counts.
CSS: For CSS, reduce the impact of render-blocking CSS by tilting critical CSS and deferring non-critical CSS. If CSS isn’t used, it simply shouldn’t be there.

First-entry delay (FID): If LCP is about loading, FID is about interactivity. Have you ever clicked on a button on a web page and had to wait forever for something to happen? That’s what FID measures: the time that elapses between the moment the user first interacts with your page and the moment the browser can react. It’s a measure of your site’s responsiveness, which can make or break the user experience.

Now consider this: is there anything more frustrating than a website that doesn’t respond when you need it to? That’s why search engines value low FID scores. If a user’s first interaction is delayed, they’re more likely to abandon the task in hand. Fast, transparent response? The user is likely to stick around.

So, how do you reduce DIF? It’s all about reducing the impact of third-party code, minimizing JavaScript execution, limiting the number of requests and the size of transfers. Third-party code can have a significant impact on your page’s performance, so it’s essential to audit and monitor these scripts. JavaScript execution should be kept to a minimum: load only what is necessary, nothing more.

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